Xbox One X vs Xbox One: 5 Things to Know Before You Upgrade

Xbox One X vs Xbox One: 5 Things to Know Before You Upgrade is a post by Josh Smith from Gotta Be Mobile.

This is what you need to know about the Xbox One X vs Xbox One if you are upgrading from the original Xbox One released in 2013. Like many gamers, you skipped the Xbox One S in favor of waiting for the 4K powerhouse formerly known as Project Scorpio. Here’s a look at the most important things that Xbox One to Xbox One X upgraders need to know.

We’ll compare the two consoles’ features, prices, support for accessories and other details that you need to consider if you are planning to upgrade to 4K gaming when the Xbox One X release date arrives this fall.

Read: How to Know When Xbox One X Pre-Orders Start

Microsoft no longer sells the original Xbox One, so you cannot buy this model anymore, but your console still has value and you can keep most of your current investment if you upgrade to the One X.

Xbox One X vs Xbox One Features

The biggest difference you will see when you upgrade to the Xbox One X from an original Xbox is what games look like. The newest Xbox One support 4K and HDR gaming. Even if you don’t have a 4K TV connected, you will see benefits thanks to SuperSampling.

With 4K gaming, there are more details on the screen and environments look more realistic. If you have a 4K device, watch this Forza 7 gameplay video in 4K to see what this can look like when you play games on the Xbox One X.

What you need to know about the Xbox One vs Xbox One X.
What you need to know about the Xbox One vs Xbox One X.

When connected to a TV that supports HDR, you will see more vibrant visuals as well. After playing several games on the PS4 that support HDR, the difference is incredible. It is very likely that you will notice this upgrade more than you will notice the 4K gaming. With the Xbox One X, you also get a 4K BluRay player built in so you can watch movies in 4K HDR when connected to a compatible TV.

The original Xbox only supports gaming at 1080P and has no HDR support. You can play BluRay disks, but you cannot watch the 4K BluRay version with the Xbox One from 2013.

Thanks to the upgraded Xbox One X specs, games will show you more of the world around you including a farther horizon in open world games and you will see faster load times. The new processor will also allow the newer Xbox One to deliver more realistic environments than you will see on your original Xbox.

One feature that the two consoles share is support for spatial audio with Dolby Atmos and DTS:X that can deliver immersive audio that makes it sound like you are in the middle of your game or movie. Both consoles support this when playing games or streaming supported content, but only the Xbox One X supports it on 4K BluRay disks.

You can plug in an HDMI cable to hook your cable or satellite into both consoles. You can also use this to run another HDMI device into your console like an Xbox 360 or PS4.

The Xbox One X does not include a port for the Kinect. You can buy a USB Kinect adapter to keep using the Kinect that came with your original Xbox One if you want to continue using it.

Xbox One X vs Xbox One Specs

The new Xbox One X is smaller, supports 4K, delivers better-looking games even on a 1080P TV and adds a ton of power to your setup. Her are the original Xbox One vs Xbox One X Specs that you need to compare as you contemplate upgrading.

 Xbox OneXbox One X
Price$499 Original ($299 Final)$499
Size13.1 x 10.8 x 3.1 Inches11.81 x 9.45 x 2.36 Inches
Weight7.05 Pounds8.4 Pounds
Resolution720P, 1080P720P, 1080P, 4K (HDR)
ProcessorAMD Jaguar 1.75Ghz 8-coreAMD 2.3Ghz 8 Core
GPU853MHz, 1.3TFLOP1.17GHz, 6TFLOP
RAM8GB DDR312GB GDDR5
Storage500GB, 1TB1TB
USB StorageYesYes
Disk DriveBluRay, DVD4K BluRay, DVD
WiFi802.11a/b/g/n802.11a/b/g/n/ac
Network10/100/1000 ethernet10/100/1000 ethernet
PortsHDMI 1.4, S/PDIF, USB 3.0, Kinect PortHDMI 2.0b, SPDIF, USB 3.0, IR Blaster
Power SupplyExternal BrickInternal
ControllerOriginal Xbox One X ControllerRedesigned Controller with Bluetooth & 3.5mm Headphone Jack

Xbox One X vs Xbox One Price

The Xbox One X price is tough to swallow for some users. You’ll have to pay $499 plus tax when you buy it later this year. The original Xbox One launched at $499 then dropped to $299 eventually and the Xbox One S that replaced it is now at $249 thanks to discounts.

You can still expect about $100 to $150 if you sell your original Xbox One to a private party and you can count on $75 to $100 in trade-in at retailers like GameStop, Best Buy or Amazon.

Xbox One X vs Xbox One Games

All of your Xbox One games work on the Xbox One X. If you bought them digitally you just need to sign in and download the games to get started. Otherwise, you can pop your disk in and get going. Both consoles support the Xbox and Xbox 360 backward compatibility so you can play your old games without the need to have your old console connected anymore. The list of Xbox One games below get a special update for the Xbox One X to add 4K and or HDR support.

You will automatically get the free Xbox One X title update for these games this fall after the Xbox One X release date arrives. You may not see the update land for all of the games on the same day.

Xbox One X vs Xbox One Accessories

You'll need an adapter to use the Kinect with the Xbox One X.
You’ll need an adapter to use the Kinect with the Xbox One X.

All of your Xbox One accessories will work with the Xbox One X. That means your controllers, cables and more will work with the new Xbox. This helps take a little sting out of the high Xbox One X price.

As we mentioned, you will need a Kinect adapter to use it with the Xbox One X. This is normally $39.99, but there was a free program when users upgraded from the original Xbox One to the Xbox One S. We’re hopeful that Microsoft will bring this program back to life in 2017.

Xbox One X vs Xbox One: 5 Things to Know Before You Upgrade is a post by Josh Smith from Gotta Be Mobile.