Patent Application Gives us a Better Look at the New RED Hydrogen One

Toward the end of last week RED, a company who is known for high quality video cameras, announced they would be releasing a new smartphone. This seemed out of left field as the company is mostly known for their cameras and not only that, but their cameras are known for being very modular and very expensive. We’ve seen this trend where traditional smartphone OEMs are focusing on the quality of its camera sensors, but RED diving into the market could change things entirely.

They key feature that most people took away from the initial announcement was the Hydrogen One’s holographic display. The company says the phone’s display will let you view 3D, VR, AR, MR, and holographic RED Hydrogen 4-View (H4V) content without using any sort of headset or glasses or anything other accessory. The details of this display have yet to be revealed, but it was still enough to catch the eye of many enthusiasts within the Android community.

Another key element of the new Hydrogen One from RED is its modular capabilities. Sadly, modular smartphones have not had the best reception within the community. Lenovo’s Moto Mods have captured a niche within the Android user base, but even it hasn’t seem to catch on as much as some had hoped. This is another area where RED could transform the smartphone market as their modular system for the cameras they sell are what have brought them a lot of customers.

 

While we still don’t know much about the company’s modular design, a recently discovered patent application filed in December of 2015 gives us a glimpse at what we could expect. Granted, features included in a patent do not guarantee that they’ll be in the final product, but it gives us an idea at what they could be shooting for. It does mention some example modules such as a spare battery, a speaker, camera sensor, and a projector. Modules shown off in the patent can stack on either the front or the back of the RED Hydrogen One and could end up letting you put together a system that looks and performs like an actual DSLR. Follow the link below to check out the full patent.


Via: The Verge Source: USPTO