U.S. Senate votes to reinstate ZTE sales ban

By | 19th June 2018
ZTE logo Blade 6

The saga of ZTE and its ban on buying components from U.S. companies continues today, and this time it's not good news for the company.

The U.S. Senate today voted to pass the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) that, in addition to being a military funding bill, included wording to reimpose sanctions against ZTE. The bill passed with 85 votes for and 10 votes against.

Here's what Senators Marco Rubio (R-FL), Tom Cotton (R-AR), Chuck Schumer (D-NY), and Chris Van Hollen (D-MD) had to say about the passing of this bill: 

"We’re heartened that both parties made it clear that protecting American jobs and national security must come first when making deals with countries like China, which has a history of having little regard for either. It is vital that our colleagues in the House keep this bipartisan provision in the bill as it heads towards a conference."

Now that the bill has passed the Senate, it'll go to a conference committee that'll work out the differences between it and the version that passed the House of Representatives last month. It's possible that the bill and its sanctions against ZTE could end up on the desk of President Trump for approval or veto.

There's been quite a bit of back and forth with ZTE and this ban. Most recently, President Trump said that he was working with Chinese President Xi Jinping to get ZTE back into business, and it looked like ZTE had reached a deal with the U.S. government that'd see it pay more than $1 billion. Now it's possible that the ban against ZTE, which the company has said will "severely impact" its survival, could remain in place.