Best Android Video Camera in 2018

By | 21st July 2018

Best overall

Samsung Galaxy S9+

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The Galaxy S9+ takes fantastic photos, and the quality carries over to video as well. An f/1.5 lens lets in lots of light, keeping noise down even in dark scenes, and you can shoot at up to 4K resolution at 60 fps that'll even look good on a large TV. The combination of OIS and EIS provides very smooth video, particularly when shooting in 1080p.

The GS9+ also has the extra trick of offering 960 fps super slow-mo, with an easy-to-use interface, in addition to "standard" 240 fps slow-mo that's still slower than many phones. You can also use the secondary camera to provide an optical 2X zoom, which is incredibly important for video that very quickly gets pixelated when zooming.

Bottom line: The Galaxy S9+ video camera is capable in both basic and advanced situations, with extra software and hardware features to help you get just the shot you want.

One more thing: The smaller (and cheaper) Galaxy S9 has all of the same video capabilities, aside from the secondary telephoto lens.

Why the Galaxy S9+ is the best video camera

Much like its photo prowess, the Galaxy S9+ has a ton to offer to those who capture videos. The basic point-and-shoot nature of the camera interface lends itself well to casual shooters, and the standard video captured both looks great and is stable even if you move around a bit. The f/1.5 lens lets it take better-looking video in low-light situations than most other cameras.

Samsung's flagship offers a ton to video shooters.

But the Galaxy S9+ really comes alive when you start to look into all of its advanced features and capabilities. You can shoot in up to 4K resolution at 60 frames per second, which puts it in an exclusive group, but you can also scale it back and shoot 1080p with extra features. No matter what you can zoom using the secondary camera lens to geta 2X "telephoto" look without losing resolution.

Samsung also offers industry-leading slow motion options. If there's a lot of light to work with the 960 frame per second slow-mo is amazing to see, and the software makes it very easy to capture. There's also still-impressive 240 fps recording at 1080p resolution, which is still slower than many phones.

Samsung's flagship offers a ton to video shooters, and you also get an overall great phone outside of the camera.

Best stabilization

Google Pixel 2 XL

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Like its predecessors, the Google Pixel 2 and 2 XL have absolutely fantastic video stabilization that's just unrivaled in smartphones. The new phones add OIS to the already fantastic EIS to create buttery smooth video whether you're riding along in a car or train, or just walking down the street with the phone in your hand.

Google uses some pretty advanced software to process the video and smooth it out, and it does so without much of the jarring "jelly" effect that you sometimes see when adding stabilization after the fact in video editors. The camera app doesn't offer other advanced features, but it absolutely nails the stabilization.

Bottom line: If all you want to do is shoot stable video on the move and don't need any other advanced features, the Pixel 2 XL is the one to get.

One more thing: For the exact same video experience in a smaller size (and lower price), you can get the standard Pixel 2.

Best manual controls

LG G7 ThinQ

See at B&H Photo

What, no LG V30? The G7 ThinQ, despite not being part of the video-focused "V" lineup, does everything its older counterpart does with better hardware and an improved secondary sensor. By "everything" we mean literally everything: LG has brought over the same powerful, easy-to-use, and fun manual controls from the V30 to the G7 ThinQ.

Moreover, the G7 is just a great phone overall, with a beautiful 6.1-inch display, an awesome design, and wide availability in the U.S. and Canada.

Bottom line: The LG G7 shoots awesome, stabilized 4K video from its main sensor and then lets you get wild and creative with awesome manual controls and a fun wide-angle lens.

Best for less

OnePlus 6

See at OnePlus

The OnePlus 6 does an admirable job in the video department, especially considering its more reasonable price than the other members of this group. The f/1.7 lens and solid sensor offer good video quality, and the OIS is aided by really good EIS for smooth shooting in shaky conditions.

You can also shoot up to 4K resolution at 60 fps, or choose between 240 or 120 fps slow-motion video. The rest of the features are pretty basic, though, so don't expect a bunch of advanced features.

Bottom line: You get all of the basic features and pretty good quality for a couple hundred dollars less than the competitors.

One more thing: If you're going to shoot lots of 4K video, consider getting the 128GB or 256GB internal storage model for $50 or $100 more, respectively.

Conclusion

The Galaxy S9+ is the best Android phone for shooting video, bringing tons of advanced features but also simplicity when you need it. The Pixel 2 XL's video stabilization is the best in the business, and is worth considering if that's important to you. The LG G7 has all the manual controls you could ever want, and the OnePlus 6 offers really good all-around video capabilities at a lower price than the competition.

Best overall

Samsung Galaxy S9+

See at Amazon

The Galaxy S9+ takes fantastic photos, and the quality carries over to video as well. An f/1.5 lens lets in lots of light, keeping noise down even in dark scenes, and you can shoot at up to 4K resolution at 60 fps that'll even look good on a large TV. The combination of OIS and EIS provides very smooth video, particularly when shooting in 1080p.

The GS9+ also has the extra trick of offering 960 fps super slow-mo, with an easy-to-use interface, in addition to "standard" 240 fps slow-mo that's still slower than many phones. You can also use the secondary camera to provide an optical 2X zoom, which is incredibly important for video that very quickly gets pixelated when zooming.

Bottom line: The Galaxy S9+ video camera is capable in both basic and advanced situations, with extra software and hardware features to help you get just the shot you want.

One more thing: The smaller (and cheaper) Galaxy S9 has all of the same video capabilities, aside from the secondary telephoto lens.

Update July 2018: The LG V30 has dropped from the list due to its age, replaced by the Galaxy S9+ which has great quality, cool slow-motion capability and a telephoto lens, as well as the LG G7. The Pixel 2 XL remains as the best stabilized shooter, and the Note 8 leaves on account of the GS9+ being added. The OnePlus 6 hops on as a good budget option that still offers quality video capture.